Tag Archives: Global

Divided World, Divided Class: Global Political Economy and the Stratification of

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Urbanism, Colonialism and the World-Economy : Cultural and Spatial Foundation...

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Divided World, Divided Class: Global Political Economy and the Stratification of

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Divided World, Divided Class: Global Political Economy and the Stratification of

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The Reputation Economy: How to Optimize Your Digital Footprint in a World Where

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Climate Change Conference – Global Challenges, Local Solutions

Climate Change Conference – Global Challenges, Local Solutions
Event on 2016-03-19 13:30:00
CLIMATE CHANGE IS REAL AND ARGUABLY THE MOST IMPORTANT CRISIS IN HUMAN HISTORY.  How do we bring about the transformation to a low/zero carbon world following the euphoria of the December 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP21), in which 195 countries signed a historic climate deal to limit global warming to below 2 degrees? On Earth Day 2016, United Nations House Scotland (UNH) is delighted to invite you to a small, interactive conference in which you will have the opportunity to listen to a panel of experts and for your voice to be heard. We hope that this conference will inspire thought, and stimulate discussion and debate amongst students, academics and civil society about the way we engage with our planet. Two Sessions will take place throughout the afternoon, with leading experts giving presentations on key issues from both a global and Scottish perspective. Following each session, the audience will be given an opportunity to engage with the Presenters.  Everyone is Welcome! Our Keynote Speakers include: Tessa Tennant: President of the Ice Organisation and non-executive director of the UK Green Investment Bank Tom Ballantine: Chairman of Stop Climate Chaos Scotland Navraj Singh Ghaleigh: Senior Lecturer Climate Law, Edinburgh University Fiona Macleod: Edinburgh Adapts Project Peter Dauerhauer: Researcher in Electronics and Electrical Engineering at Strathclyde University Malcolm Spaven: Chairman of the OpenCast Communities Alliance Apruv Gupta: COP21 Attendee, Edinburgh University Student Chair and Moderator: Dr Gari Donn: UN House Executive Director Refreshments will be served and there will be opportunities to network.   All Proceeds from the tickets will go to fund the Internship Programme at UN House.

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The Guardian view on the global economy: China sends a shiver through Davos

The Guardian view on the global economy: China sends a shiver through Davos
China's economy is slowing. For any other country, an annual growth rate of 6.8% would be exceptional: for China it was the weakest rate of expansion in 25 years. Developments in what is now the world's second biggest economy are the reason financial …
Read more on The Guardian

Clarkson University's SV Babu Receives Second Prestigious IBM Faculty Award
Clarkson University launches leaders into the global economy. One in five alumni already leads as a CEO, VP or equivalent senior executive of a company. Clarkson is a nationally recognized research university for undergraduates with select graduate …
Read more on Clarkson University News (press release)

The Populist Revolution: Bernie Sanders and Beyond. Nationalizing the Failed
The world is undergoing a populist revival. From the revolt against austerity led by the Syriza Party in Greece … Her solution is largely to preserve the status quo while imposing more bank regulation. That approach, however, was already tried with …
Read more on Center for Research on Globalization


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Al Jazeera and the Global Media Landscape: The South Is Talking Back: The South Is Talking Back

Al Jazeera and the Global Media Landscape: The South Is Talking Back: The South Is Talking Back


This book analyzes how and why Al Jazeera English (AJE) became the channel of choice to understand the massive protests across the Arab world 2011. Aiming to explain the ‘Al Jazeera moment,’ it tracks the channel’s bumpy road towards international recognition in a longitudinal, in-depth analysis of the channel’s editorial profile and strategies. Studying AJE from its launch in mid-November 2006 to the ‘Arab Spring’, it explains and problematizes the channel’s ambitious editorial agenda and strategies, examines the internal conflicts, practical challenges and minor breakthroughs in its formative years. The Al Jazeera-phenomenon has received massive attention, but it remains under-researched. The growth of transnational satellite television has transformed the global media landscape into a complex web of multi-vocal, multimedia and multi-directional flows. Based on a combination of policy, production- and content analysis of comprehensive empirical data the book offers an innovative perspective on the theorization of global news contra-flows. By problematizing the distinctive characteristics of AJE, it examines the strategic motivation behind the channel and the ways in which its production processes and news profile are meant to be different from its Anglo-American competitors. These questions underscore a central nexus of the book: the changing relationship between transnational satellite news and power.

Price: $ 158.53
Sold by Kobo Canada Social Science $ 158.53This book analyzes how and why Al Jazeera English (AJE) became the channel of choice to understand the massive protests across the Arab world 2011. Aiming to explain the ‘Al Jazeera moment,’ it tracks the channel’s bumpy road towards international recognition in a longitudinal, in-depth analysis of the channel’s editorial profile and strategies. Studying AJE from its launch in mid-November 2006 to the ‘Arab Spring’, it explains and problematizes the channel’s ambitious editorial agenda and stratобзоры ноутбуков

World News Prism: Global Information in a Satellite Age

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Ten Questions for the Global Economy

Ten Questions for the Global Economy
In the summer of 2015, the global economy started weakening, especially in energy-intensive countries such as China and Brazil, as well as in energy-producing Russia. Going forward, if the price of oil remains under USD 60 per barrel, producers will …
Read more on EconoMonitor (blog)

Global Carbon Project: Study suggests greenhouse gas emissions may have
Estimates for 2015 show that greenhouse gas emissions may actually have dropped for the first time since the global financial crisis. Dr Pep Canadell, executive director of the Global Carbon Project, said economic growth was at around 3 per cent last …
Read more on ABC Online

UN: World economy stumbled in 2015
UNITED NATIONS – The world economy stumbled in 2015, with growth estimated at just 2.4 percent this year following a nearly 60 percent drop in oil prices and an over 20 percent fall in commodity prices in the last 18 months, according to a U.N. report …
Read more on Moscow-Pullman Daily News

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Financial Emancipation: A Blueprint for Building Wealth and Acquiring Your First Million in the Global Super Affluent Economy

Financial Emancipation: A Blueprint for Building Wealth and Acquiring Your First Million in the Global Super Affluent Economy


Financial Emancipation explains why it’s essential for everyone in the global economy to have a wealth-building plan. The book demonstrates how regular people can reach millionaire status and join the growing number of affluent households. The state of the global economy, the world’s new affluent class, and how the millionaire machine generates global millionaires are discussed in detail. Financial Emancipation describes how wealth creation results when investors follow the book’s investment philosophy and adopt the millionaire mindset This book provides readers with the investment tools needed to achieve financial independence in the world’s new wealth based economy. The author is an attorney writing about the investment techniques the three generations of his family used to create multigenerational wealth.

Price: $ 9.03
Sold by Kobo Inc. (France) Business & Finance $ 9.03Financial Emancipation explains why it’s essential for everyone in the global economy to have a wealth-building plan. The book demonstrates how regular people can reach millionaire status and join the growing number of affluent households. The state of the global economy, the world’s new affluent class, and how the millionaire machine generates global millionaires are discussed in detail. Financial Emancipation describes how wealth creation results when investors follow the book’s investment pcore i5

The Great Brain Race: How Global Universities Are Reshaping the World

The Great Brain Race: How Global Universities Are Reshaping the World


In The Great Brain Race, former U.S. News & World Report education editor Ben Wildavsky presents the first popular account of how international competition for the brightest minds is transforming the world of higher education-and why this revolution should be welcomed, not feared. Every year, nearly three million international students study outside of their home countries, a 40 percent increase since 1999. Newly created or expanded universities in China, India, and Saudi Arabia are competing with the likes of Harvard and Oxford for faculty, students, and research preeminence. Satellite campuses of Western universities are springing up from Abu Dhabi and Singapore to South Africa. Wildavsky shows that as international universities strive to become world-class, the new global education marketplace is providing more opportunities to more people than ever before. Drawing on extensive reporting in China, India, the United States, Europe, and the Middle East, Wildavsky chronicles the unprecedented international mobility of students and faculty, the rapid spread of branch campuses, the growth of for-profit universities, and the remarkable international expansion of college rankings. Some university and government officials see the rise of worldwide academic competition as a threat, going so far as to limit student mobility or thwart cross-border university expansion. But Wildavsky argues that this scholarly marketplace is creating a new global meritocracy, one in which the spread of knowledge benefits everyone-both educationally and economically.

Price: $ 22.79
Sold by Kobo Inc. (France) Higher Education $ 22.79In The Great Brain Race, former U.S. News & World Report education editor Ben Wildavsky presents the first popular account of how international competition for the brightest minds is transforming the world of higher education-and why this revolution should be welcomed, not feared. Every year, nearly three million international students study outside of their home countries, a 40 percent increase since 1999. Newly created or expanded universities in China, India, and Saudi Arabia are competing wноутбуки

360° View On The Economy: Global, National & Local

360° View On The Economy: Global, National & Local
Event on 2015-09-16 07:15:00
360° View On The Economy: Global, National & Local presented by The CFO Leadership Council & The Controllers Leadership Council Wednesday September 16, 2015 @ 7:15am – 9:30am (program will begin promptly at 7:45am) Bentley University's Wilder Pavilion (new location!) Program Description Join us at our kickoff event to hear from a panel of distinguished economists who will give their perspective and insight about current and future economies at the State, Federal and Global level.  Be informed about economic challenges, market growth and contractions, interest rate predictions at home and globally (during the 2016 presidential campaign or election year). Learning Objectives Updates will include: Current status of global, national and local economies which will provide insight to making key business decisions Key monetary drivers and forces within control and without; Janet Yellen & the Fed Expectations about the future direction of all economies and how it affects us Political scene – what's hot/what's not, and what's in store for the economies during the U.S. Presidential campaign Interest rate predictions/cause & effect on business and personal wealth Speakers         moderator Peter Howe Business Editor    "CEO Corner" Host    NECN   Alan Clayton Matthews Associate Professor School of Public Policy Northeastern University  Robert Murphy Associate Professor   Director, Int'l Studies   Boston College  Scott Sumner Professor, Economics Bentley University    Registration:   To register for this program, simply complete the form above. CFO Leadership Council and Controllers Leadership Council Boston members may attend this program for free.  CFO Leadership Council members from all our chapters may also attend for free. Non-member senior financial executives who are CFOs, Vice Presidents of Finance, Directors of Finance and Controllers (or the like) are welcome to attend this program for . Please note that service providers or any executives who are not senior financial executives (CFOs, Vice Presidents of Finance, Controllers, Directors of Finance, etc.) will not be admitted attendance to this event. The CFO Leadership Council reserves the right to decline any registration. More Information:  For more information about this program or The CFO Leadership Council, please contact Kristin Todd, Marketing Director, Boston Chapters at kristin@cfoleadershipcouncil.com.   CPE Information: Program level: Advanced Requested CPE: 2 Credits, Field of Study: Economics Program Prerequisites: None Advanced Preparation: None Delivery Method: Live/Group  The CFO RoundTable is registered with the National Association of State Boards-of-Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors. State boards of accountancy have final authority on the acceptance of individual courses for CPE credit. Complaints regarding registered sponsors may be addressed to the National Registry of CPE Sponsors, 150 Fourth Avenue North, Suite 700, Nashville, TN, 37219-2417. Website: www.nasba.org About Our Speakers: Peter Howe, Business Editor/"CEO Corner" host, New England Cable News Business Editor Peter Howe joined NECN in April 2008 and reports each night for NECN Business and other NECN news programs.  He hosts NECN's CEO Corner interview show, airing Sunday nights at 8:30 p.m., and also appears each Sunday on This Week in Business with co-hosts Mike Nikitas, NECN anchor, and Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce president Paul Guzzi.  He's reported extensively for NECN on the rollout of casino gambling in Massachusetts, residential and commercial real estate developments and trends, aviation and rail transportation, and job market and economic trends, and fills in as a business anchor.  He also reports NECN's weekly Money Saving Mondays consumer advice feature and is a frequent host or panel moderator for business and economic forums.  Howe came to NECN following two decades with The Boston Globe, where he edited several editions of The Globe 100 and covered the Massachusetts State House, Big Dig, Boston Harbor cleanup, Boston City Hall, and business beats including airlines, energy, telecommunications, and technology. Born in Boston, Howe lives in Newton, Mass., and is married to the novelist Holly LeCraw Howe (The Swimming Pool, The Half-Brother) and graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1986. Alan Clayton Matthews, Associate Professor, School of Public Policy and Economics Department, Northeastern University  Alan Clayton-Matthews is a professor and director of quantitative methods in the School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs. He spent his 2007 sabbatical leave at the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy. At the Center, he was the chief designer of the Labor Market Assessment Tool (LMAT) and has served as a consultant on a number of projects, including "Staying Power: The Future of Manufacturing in Massachusetts." Clayton-Matthews is co-editor of Massachusetts Benchmarks, a joint publication of the University of Massachusetts and the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston that presents timely information and analysis about the performance of the Massachusetts economy. He is also a Director of the New England Economic Project, a group of economists and managers from academia, business, and government who study and forecast the New England economy.  Previously, Clayton-Matthews has worked as an economist and policy analyst for the Massachusetts Department of Revenue, the Social Welfare Research Institute at Boston College, and DRI/McGraw-Hill. He received his PhD in economics from Boston College. Robert Murphy, Associate Professor, Director, International Studies Program, Department of Economics, Boston College Robert G. Murphy is a faculty member in the Department of Economics at Boston College in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, where he has taught since 1984.  He served as a senior economist on the staff of President Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisers from 1995 to 1996.  His duties at the Council included macroeconomic analysis, along with editing and contributing to the Weekly Economic Briefing of the President.  Professor Murphy has worked as a consultant to private industry, governments, and international institutions.  He is the author of numerous articles in economics journals and the business press, and is a frequent commentator for media outlets.     Professor Murphy received a B.A. degree, magna cum laude with highest honors in economics, from Williams College in 1979 and a Ph.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1984.  His areas of specialization are macroeconomics and international finance.    Professor Murphy teaches macroeconomics, international finance, and development economics to both graduate and undergraduates at Boston College, and heads the undergraduate honors program in economics.  He has been a chair and member of many Ph.D. dissertation committees.  Presently, he is serving as Director of the International Studies Program, which offers an interdisciplinary course of study for students interested in international affairs.   Scott Sumner, Professor, Economics, Bentley University

at Bentley University
175 Forest Street
Waltham, United StatesBentley University deeo

Healthcare in a Global Economy

As a small business owner, healthcare costs are killing me. I therefore try to pay attention to the current debate taking place in Congress over national healthcare. Sadly, I think the debate fails to address what is really needed and why it is needed. I am just beginning to comprehend what is happening globally. Sure, all of us read about outsourcing. But, it is beginning to dawn on me exactly what this means and how big this transformation really is. There is no stopping globalization because it makes incredible economic sense. I am schizophrenic about globalization. I think it is wonderful that India, China, Vietnam, and many many countries are lifting millions and millions of people out of poverty. I think it is wonderful that we can by clothing and equipment at considerably cheaper prices due to the savings in labor. But, it comes with a tremendous cost companies in America and to skilled labor in the developed world.

A year ago, I watched John McCain give a speech to auto workers in Michigan. Remember how he gave ‘town hall’ type presentations? Someone asked him how he was going to save their jobs. And, in a rare moment of political honesty he sadly responded, “The jobs are not coming back.” He went on to say how the government needed to fund training for new jobs. I was shocked! And, I did not completely understand what he was saying. But, the question and answer stayed with me. There is a worldwide surplus of auto manufacturing capabilities. That is the primary reason for the crisis in Detroit. Sure, we can blame unions if we are on the political right. Or, we can blame gas guzzling behemoths if we are on the political left. But, both complaints miss the larger point. The point is that you can build a very good car in Korea cheaper than in the U.S. And, you can build it cheaper still in China or India. I hate saying this, but the truth is the income levels of our autoworkers must come down due to international competition. McCain was right, those jobs are not coming back. We used to build 13,000,000 cars a year here. Now we build 10,000,000. Obama’s auto efforts, right or wrong, are an attempt to save maybe 8,000,000 U.S. built cars. And, even then, it cannot happen under the old wage system. Again, I hate this reality. But, it is reality nonetheless. International competition is driving down costs.

My business is a piece of pollen floating in the wind. I have a small manufacturing company with 12 employees. I am a working stiff who puts in 70 hour weeks for an average salary most years. I cannot outsource my business because I would have to carry huge finished product inventory and I do not have the funds to do so. I am a tiny version of Detroit. The big guys in my industry have all gone to China. I compete against companies that are paying $ .30 an hour in wages. If I am going to survive, I damned well better have some competitive advantages that China cannot provide. I will not elaborate, but I do have advantages. Still, I need to reduce my prices. Now, I have a group of employees that I will pit against any work force anywhere. They are hard working and take great pride in producing good product. But, they earn between $ 10.00 and $ 15.00 an hour. If I raise that labor rate, I am out of business. The company will close and those people will be looking for new jobs. And, those new jobs will likely not pay even what I pay. We all have to better understand what is happening globally, to better understand what is happening in America. The world is transforming. And, the result is that there is going to be tremendous dislocation for the working class in this country. And, that dislocation is permanent. It has nothing to do with Wall Street. It has nothing to do with unions. It is entirely related to globalization which is unavoidable.

I want to give two personal illustrations about globalization and then return to healthcare. About 1 1/2 years ago I built my own website. As many of you know, a website is nothing without traffic. How do you get people to find your site? We all use Google or some other search engine when we are trying to find something. How do you get your company listed on the first page of Google? The process of developing good ‘page rankings’ is called Search Engine Optimization – SEO. I called perhaps 7 or 8 U.S. based companies that specialize in this. I could not afford them. I also bought 2 books on it. One of the books mentioned an internet company, ODesk, that deals with an entire range of computer issues. If you do anything with websites, you have to check out this company. Basically, you write up a job description you want done and place it on ODesk. Qualified specialists from all over the world, bid on the job. I have hired people from India 3 times, one from Britain, one from Russia, and one from the U.S. We instant message and they do the job in a couple days. I have saved thousands of dollars by going to India to have my work done. That is what we are facing – globalization. I am now seriously looking at hiring an accounting company from India to do my books and taxes. It will halve my accounting costs.

This is the world we live in and nothing is going to change it. And, because I am not the brightest guy, I did not understand, until recently that I too am a player in globalization. So, my point thus far is to illustrate what is happening to millions of jobs in the U.S. John McCain, in a rare moment of political honesty, spoke the truth. “Those jobs are not coming back.” On a micro level millions of people and thousands of companies will disappear. On a macro level we drive down costs and raise living standards world wide. But, those job losses throw people on the street. And, since manufacturing jobs are easily exportable, a guy who used to earn $ 25 an hour as a welder in some company is now looking for work in a country with a huge surplus of welders. If he finds a welding job it will be for $ 20 if he’s lucky. That’s a $ 10,000 a year hit in income! And, most won’t find a welding job at all. They have to be retrained. “Their job isn’t coming back.” What we are witnessing is not a recession. It is incredibly bigger. We are watching a worldwide transformation of business. And there is simply no stopping that train.

So, now I will return to healthcare. Tell me how a family can afford healthcare – currently $ 12,000 a year for a family of 4 – if he’s earning $ 40,000 a year? The average family earns around that figure. And, those costs keep escalating. That is why I keep saying unless we control costs, we are doomed. No plan works. Not single payer, not co-op, not private insurance. NO PLAN WORKS! I would love for Congress to fix healthcare. But, they are tilting at windmills. Don’t get me wrong. I want healthcare fixed. But socializing healthcare does not fix it. Privatized healthcare does not fix it either. Reducing healthcare costs is the only solution. National healthcare without cost reduction is like putting the roof on a house before the walls are up.

Ultimately, we have to do two things. We have to lower costs. And, part of that cost reduction has to be with rationed healthcare. It is this second point that no politician will voice. Not true! Republicans voice it as a scare tactic. And, it truly is scary. But, it is no less real. Today we ration healthcare. We exclude poor people 40 million and growing. Is that the correct approach to healthcare? You decide. But, remember healthcare costs are going to increase. And, “Those jobs are not coming back.” The number of uninsured is likely to double without some type of reform.

I am lucky. My kid was born with a reasonable degree of intelligence. And, although he played around in Europe for a year, he eventually came home and finished college. He has a good job that cannot be outsourced. His future will be just fine. But, millions of normal people, good people, will lack job opportunities that will pay the wages of a welder. Remember too, I am going to outsource my accounting! I am talking about job losses on whole ranges of abilities. I have no solution to healthcare. But, so far no one else does either. And, all the discussion and debate in Congress on healthcare reform does NOTHING to truly address the issue.

Article Source: http://ezineseeker.com/?expert=Bruce_Schleicher

Healthcare in a Global Economy http://healthcare.ezinemark.com/healthcare-in-a-global-economy-4f0021aee77.html

As a small business owner, healthcare costs are killing me. I therefore try to pay attention to the current debate taking place in Congress over national healthcare. Sadly, I think the debate fails to address what is really needed and why it is needed. I am just beginning to comprehend what is happening globally. Sure, all of us read about outsourcing. But, it is beginning to dawn on me exactly what this means and how big this transformation really is. There is no stopping globalization because it makes incredible economic sense. I am schizophrenic about globalization. I think it is wonderful that India, China, Vietnam, and many many countries are lifting millions and millions of people out of poverty. I think it is wonderful that we can by clothing and equipment at considerably cheaper prices due to the savings in labor. But, it comes with a tremendous cost companies in America and to skilled labor in the developed world.

A year ago, I watched John McCain give a speech to auto workers in Michigan. Remember how he gave ‘town hall’ type presentations? Someone asked him how he was going to save their jobs. And, in a rare moment of political honesty he sadly responded, “The jobs are not coming back.” He went on to say how the government needed to fund training for new jobs. I was shocked! And, I did not completely understand what he was saying. But, the question and answer stayed with me. There is a worldwide surplus of auto manufacturing capabilities. That is the primary reason for the crisis in Detroit. Sure, we can blame unions if we are on the political right. Or, we can blame gas guzzling behemoths if we are on the political left. But, both complaints miss the larger point. The point is that you can build a very good car in Korea cheaper than in the U.S. And, you can build it cheaper still in China or India. I hate saying this, but the truth is the income levels of our autoworkers must come down due to international competition. McCain was right, those jobs are not coming back. We used to build 13,000,000 cars a year here. Now we build 10,000,000. Obama’s auto efforts, right or wrong, are an attempt to save maybe 8,000,000 U.S. built cars. And, even then, it cannot happen under the old wage system. Again, I hate this reality. But, it is reality nonetheless. International competition is driving down costs.

My business is a piece of pollen floating in the wind. I have a small manufacturing company with 12 employees. I am a working stiff who puts in 70 hour weeks for an average salary most years. I cannot outsource my business because I would have to carry huge finished product inventory and I do not have the funds to do so. I am a tiny version of Detroit. The big guys in my industry have all gone to China. I compete against companies that are paying $ .30 an hour in wages. If I am going to survive, I damned well better have some competitive advantages that China cannot provide. I will not elaborate, but I do have advantages. Still, I need to reduce my prices. Now, I have a group of employees that I will pit against any work force anywhere. They are hard working and take great pride in producing good product. But, they earn between $ 10.00 and $ 15.00 an hour. If I raise that labor rate, I am out of business. The company will close and those people will be looking for new jobs. And, those new jobs will likely not pay even what I pay. We all have to better understand what is happening globally, to better understand what is happening in America. The world is transforming. And, the result is that there is going to be tremendous dislocation for the working class in this country. And, that dislocation is permanent. It has nothing to do with Wall Street. It has nothing to do with unions. It is entirely related to globalization which is unavoidable.

I want to give two personal illustrations about globalization and then return to healthcare. About 1 1/2 years ago I built my own website. As many of you know, a website is nothing without traffic. How do you get people to find your site? We all use Google or some other search engine when we are trying to find something. How do you get your company listed on the first page of Google? The process of developing good ‘page rankings’ is called Search Engine Optimization – SEO. I called perhaps 7 or 8 U.S. based companies that specialize in this. I could not afford them. I also bought 2 books on it. One of the books mentioned an internet company, ODesk, that deals with an entire range of computer issues. If you do anything with websites, you have to check out this company. Basically, you write up a job description you want done and place it on ODesk. Qualified specialists from all over the world, bid on the job. I have hired people from India 3 times, one from Britain, one from Russia, and one from the U.S. We instant message and they do the job in a couple days. I have saved thousands of dollars by going to India to have my work done. That is what we are facing – globalization. I am now seriously looking at hiring an accounting company from India to do my books and taxes. It will halve my accounting costs.

This is the world we live in and nothing is going to change it. And, because I am not the brightest guy, I did not understand, until recently that I too am a player in globalization. So, my point thus far is to illustrate what is happening to millions of jobs in the U.S. John McCain, in a rare moment of political honesty, spoke the truth. “Those jobs are not coming back.” On a micro level millions of people and thousands of companies will disappear. On a macro level we drive down costs and raise living standards world wide. But, those job losses throw people on the street. And, since manufacturing jobs are easily exportable, a guy who used to earn $ 25 an hour as a welder in some company is now looking for work in a country with a huge surplus of welders. If he finds a welding job it will be for $ 20 if he’s lucky. That’s a $ 10,000 a year hit in income! And, most won’t find a welding job at all. They have to be retrained. “Their job isn’t coming back.” What we are witnessing is not a recession. It is incredibly bigger. We are watching a worldwide transformation of business. And there is simply no stopping that train.

So, now I will return to healthcare. Tell me how a family can afford healthcare – currently $ 12,000 a year for a family of 4 – if he’s earning $ 40,000 a year? The average family earns around that figure. And, those costs keep escalating. That is why I keep saying unless we control costs, we are doomed. No plan works. Not single payer, not co-op, not private insurance. NO PLAN WORKS! I would love for Congress to fix healthcare. But, they are tilting at windmills. Don’t get me wrong. I want healthcare fixed. But socializing healthcare does not fix it. Privatized healthcare does not fix it either. Reducing healthcare costs is the only solution. National healthcare without cost reduction is like putting the roof on a house before the walls are up.

Ultimately, we have to do two things. We have to lower costs. And, part of that cost reduction has to be with rationed healthcare. It is this second point that no politician will voice. Not true! Republicans voice it as a scare tactic. And, it truly is scary. But, it is no less real. Today we ration healthcare. We exclude poor people 40 million and growing. Is that the correct approach to healthcare? You decide. But, remember healthcare costs are going to increase. And, “Those jobs are not coming back.” The number of uninsured is likely to double without some type of reform.

I am lucky. My kid was born with a reasonable degree of intelligence. And, although he played around in Europe for a year, he eventually came home and finished college. He has a good job that cannot be outsourced. His future will be just fine. But, millions of normal people, good people, will lack job opportunities that will pay the wages of a welder. Remember too, I am going to outsource my accounting! I am talking about job losses on whole ranges of abilities. I have no solution to healthcare. But, so far no one else does either. And, all the discussion and debate in Congress on healthcare reform does NOTHING to truly address the issue.

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