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Voyage To The Heart Of Matter The Atlas Experiment At CERN Pop-up Book

INSIDE CERN - NEW PAPERBACK BOOK

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60 Years of Cern Experiments and Discoveries by Herwig Schopper (English) Hardco
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CERN: How We Found the Higgs Boson (Hardback or Cased Book)
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Large Hadron Collider 2012 Experiment

Scientists at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland plan to launch the huge, underground Large Hadron Collider for the second time in 2012.  This machine is expected to help scientists further their study in particle physics by experimenting with anti-matter.  The goal is to find the magic ingredient- the Higgs-boson. The Higgs-boson is the very first undiscovered, most fundamental particle in history.  The first time they fired up the LHC was back in 2008 when CERN first realized they were able to produce the anti-matter form of hydrogen.  Matter and anti-matter explode when fired into each other, so when CERN first created anti-hydrogen atoms, they were exploding when they hit the walls of the machine.  It was impossible for scientists to get the antimatter under a microscope because the life of the atom was too short.

CERN developed a way to capture the anti-hydrogen atoms before they hit the wall of the Large Hadron Collider and burst.  The scientists were finally successful in creating over 50,000 anti-hydrogen atoms.  This milestone leads to the new experiment in 2012 when scientists compare hydrogen atoms to anti-hydrogen leading to a new technique of studying space and time.  They feel that there could be a chance of answering the biggest question in the history of mankind, where did we come from?  The Big Bang theory stems from the idea that matter and anti-matter collided in space and exploded in turn creating other particles that contributed to life on our planet.  My question is, who created the matter that collided with the anti-matter in the first place?  Well, that’s a whole different article.

This project is controversial for many reasons, the most common concern being whether or not it is safe to test antimatter on our planet.  After all, this is what black holes are made of.  Small black holes will be created as the experiment is conducted and it is possible that they could be trapped on our planet due to gravity.  Some people are concerned that the experiment could even result in a massive black hole that swallows the earth.

Scientists claim that the small black holes will be too miniscule to thrive and would evaporate rather quickly.  According to the website cosmology.Berkeley.edu, there is not sufficient scientific evidence to predict when a black hole will evaporate.  The NASA website tells readers “only the smallest black holes (many, many orders of magnitude less massive than the sun) will have had time to significantly evaporate over the enter 14 billion year history of the universe”.  

I think the big question here should be whether or not CERN knows what to expect when playing with fire and if there is a plan in effect should something go wrong.  Are CERN scientists fully prepared or will they be diving blindly into uncharted territory?  Officials at CERN have weighed the risks and benefits and seem confident thus far that there is no need to be concerned for public safety.  What we would then ask is where do they draw the line?  What are the acceptable risks and what is unacceptable?  This is a question that is commonly raised when significant scientific research is conducted but where the line should be drawn is dependent upon so many factors that it has not yet been clearly defined.

There seems to be more people opposed to the CERN experiment than supporting it.  The general public is not necessarily comfortable putting humanity at risk and an experiment that is beyond their control in the hands of unknown scientists, no matter how qualified they may be.  The Internet is loaded with websites claiming that the Large Hadron Collider will ultimately cause the destruction of the earth in 2012.  Some religious websites claim that the end of days will occur as the result of man’s own hands and attribute the event to this upcoming experiment.  Citizens might be less opposed to the idea should this test be smaller and more controlled rather than a large-scale, 17-mile mini-Big Bang experiment.  What do you think?

By: Francis David

Francis helps people learn about Direct tv vs Dish network, and how they can save money every month with popular Dish Network offers. Francis and his team also help people determine if Satellite Internet is right for them.

Large Hadron Collider 2012 Experiment http://experiment.ezinemark.com/large-hadron-collider-2012-experiment-1670068ecc5.html

Scientists at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland plan to launch the huge, underground Large Hadron Collider for the second time in 2012.  This machine is expected to help scientists further their study in particle physics by experimenting with anti-matter.  The goal is to find the magic ingredient- the Higgs-boson. The Higgs-boson is the very first undiscovered, most fundamental particle in history.  The first time they fired up the LHC was back in 2008 when CERN first realized they were able to produce the anti-matter form of hydrogen.  Matter and anti-matter explode when fired into each other, so when CERN first created anti-hydrogen atoms, they were exploding when they hit the walls of the machine.  It was impossible for scientists to get the antimatter under a microscope because the life of the atom was too short.

CERN developed a way to capture the anti-hydrogen atoms before they hit the wall of the Large Hadron Collider and burst.  The scientists were finally successful in creating over 50,000 anti-hydrogen atoms.  This milestone leads to the new experiment in 2012 when scientists compare hydrogen atoms to anti-hydrogen leading to a new technique of studying space and time.  They feel that there could be a chance of answering the biggest question in the history of mankind, where did we come from?  The Big Bang theory stems from the idea that matter and anti-matter collided in space and exploded in turn creating other particles that contributed to life on our planet.  My question is, who created the matter that collided with the anti-matter in the first place?  Well, that’s a whole different article.

This project is controversial for many reasons, the most common concern being whether or not it is safe to test antimatter on our planet.  After all, this is what black holes are made of.  Small black holes will be created as the experiment is conducted and it is possible that they could be trapped on our planet due to gravity.  Some people are concerned that the experiment could even result in a massive black hole that swallows the earth.

Scientists claim that the small black holes will be too miniscule to thrive and would evaporate rather quickly.  According to the website cosmology.Berkeley.edu, there is not sufficient scientific evidence to predict when a black hole will evaporate.  The NASA website tells readers “only the smallest black holes (many, many orders of magnitude less massive than the sun) will have had time to significantly evaporate over the enter 14 billion year history of the universe”.  

I think the big question here should be whether or not CERN knows what to expect when playing with fire and if there is a plan in effect should something go wrong.  Are CERN scientists fully prepared or will they be diving blindly into uncharted territory?  Officials at CERN have weighed the risks and benefits and seem confident thus far that there is no need to be concerned for public safety.  What we would then ask is where do they draw the line?  What are the acceptable risks and what is unacceptable?  This is a question that is commonly raised when significant scientific research is conducted but where the line should be drawn is dependent upon so many factors that it has not yet been clearly defined.

There seems to be more people opposed to the CERN experiment than supporting it.  The general public is not necessarily comfortable putting humanity at risk and an experiment that is beyond their control in the hands of unknown scientists, no matter how qualified they may be.  The Internet is loaded with websites claiming that the Large Hadron Collider will ultimately cause the destruction of the earth in 2012.  Some religious websites claim that the end of days will occur as the result of man’s own hands and attribute the event to this upcoming experiment.  Citizens might be less opposed to the idea should this test be smaller and more controlled rather than a large-scale, 17-mile mini-Big Bang experiment.  What do you think?

By: Francis David

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